Bill Russell
Bill Russell: Career retrospective
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Despite all of the accolades, records and famous anecdotes about him, most people still don't know much about Bill Russell — the player or the person. Part of that is due to a lack of game film from his era, but part of it is due to his somewhat introverted (albeit with good reason) personality and negative opinion toward the media. Whether you're looking to learn a little more about the NBA legend or simply want to reminisce on some of his trials, tribulations and accomplishments, here's a slideshow dedicated to the unbelievable winner and complex character who helped guide the NBA through its formidable years.    1 of 20 The ultimate winner Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE via Getty Images "Bill Russell" is synonymous with "winning." The man won everything at every level of basketball. In high school he led his team to two state championships in California. At the University of San Francisco he tacked on two NCAA titles and a 55-game win streak. Next, he won an Olympic Gold Medal. He followed that up with 11 championships in 13 seasons in the NBA, including eight consecutive titles during one stretch in the 1960s. He even concluded his career by winning two championships in three seasons as a player-coach. No sport has ever seen a winner like Russell before, and no sport ever will see a winner like Russell again.    Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE via Getty Images Bill Russell accumulated a number of accolades during his Hall of Fame career. He made the All-NBA team 11 times, the All-Star team 12 times and won the Most Valuable Player award five times. He was also the first and only player-coach to win a title (he won two). However, perhaps the most impressive accolade of his career came in the 1961-62 season when he was voted Most Valuable Player after averaging a career-high 18.9 points and 23.6 rebounds per game. Why was this MVP so impressive? Because that was the same season that three other all-time NBA greats had their most impressive statistical seasons: Wilt Chamberlain averaged 50.4 points and 25.7 rebounds per game.  Oscar Robertson averaged 30.8 points, 12.5 rebounds and 11.4 assists per game (first-ever triple-double).   Elgin Baylor averaged 38.3 points and 18.6 rebounds per game. Despite having inferior statistics, Russell was voted by his peers as the NBA's MVP that season — likely the most impressive MVP award in the history of the league.   3 of 20 Statistical achievements D. Raphael/NBAE via Getty Images For a player not known for his statistical achievements, Bill Russell still put up some insane numbers during his 13-year, 963-game regular-season career, averaging 15.1 points, 22.5 rebounds, 4.3 assists and a staggering 42.3 minutes per game. (Blocks and steals were not tracked.) He led the league in rebounding five times and minutes per game once. He ranks No. 1 in NBA history by a significant amount in defensive win shares (133.6, with Tim Duncan a distant second with 106.3), and is second in total rebounds, rebounds per game and minutes per game for his career.Russell's career averages in the playoffs are even more impressive. In 165 career playoff games, he averaged 16.2 points, 24.9 rebounds, 4.7 assists and 45.4 minutes per game. In the 1962 playoffs, he averaged 48 minutes per game. The spring before, he averaged 29.9 rebounds per game. And much like the other players in the GOAT (Greatest of All Time) conversation, Russell played his best when the games mattered most, like Game 7, where he was a threat to do things like score 30 points and grab 44 rebounds in 53 minutes while holding the other team's centers to a combined 10 points and 14 rebounds like he did in Game 7 of the 1962 finals against the Lakers.   4 of 20 High school teammate Frank Robinson Troy Taormina-USA TODAY Sports Before Frank Robinson's passing earlier this month, few knew that Robinson and Bill Russell were actually basketball teammates at McClymonds High School in Oakland, California. How crazy is it that the two of the greatest players in NBA and MLB history both attended the same high school at the same time and actually played a sport together? Taking that rhetorical question a step further, how crazy is it that those same two high school teammates would go on to become the first-ever African-American head coaches in their respective sports? Absolutely insane.   Richard Mackson-USA TODAY Sports Bill Russell was born in 1934 in West Monroe, Louisiana. After struggling with the effects of living in a segregated area of the country, his family moved to Oakland, California when he was 8 years old. Russell's family lived in various projects in Oakland during a tough adolescent stage which saw him lose his mother at age 12. Russell married his high school sweetheart, Rose Swisher, with whom he'd had three children. His daughter, Karen Russell, would go on to become an attorney and television personality. Russell married two more times in his post-playing days and has lived in the Seattle area for the past four or five decades. Russell's lack of trust toward the media has always left people wanting to know a little more about the all-time winningest basketball player.   Pete Souza/White House/Sipa Press Racism was a common theme throughout Bill Russell's life. In his early years, his grandparents and parents were often the target of prejudicial acts in the heavily segregated Louisiana, where he lived until he was 8 years old. In college Russell and his black teammates were sometimes not permitted to stay in hotels for road games. Before joining the NBA, he was invited to play with the Harlem Globetrotters in an exhibition game, but the owner, Abe Saperstein, refused to speak to Russell because of the color of his skin. As a player in the NBA, Russell, like many other African-Americans, experienced racial hate that makes the hair on your skin stand up every time you read about it.   7 of 20 University of San Francisco Rich Clarkson/NCAA Photos via Getty Images Seen as raw, Bill Russell was lightly recruited out of high school but ended up at the University of San Francisco under head coach Phil Woolpert. Not only did Woolpert make NCAA history by being the first coach to start three African-American players — Russell, future Celtics teammate K.C. Jones and Hal Perry — but he also helped Russell become a superstar by emphasizing defense and fundamental play on offense. Russell returned the favor by leading San Francisco to back-to-back NCAA titles in 1955 and 1956. Russell averaged 20.7 points and 20.3 rebounds per game for his college career.    Jack O'Connell/The Boston Globe via Getty Images With few exceptions (LeBron James), most all-time NBA greats were associated with a legendary head coach. For Bill Russell, that coach was Red Auerbach. During a time when big men dominated basketball on the offensive side of the court, Auerbach saw Russell as the perfect centerpiece to his defense — a player who could protect the basket and initiate his fast break offense for Bob Cousy. Auerbach traded up in the 1956 draft to pick Russell No. 2 overall and saw immediate dividends, as Russell put up a casual 14 points and nearly 25 rebounds per game in the playoffs on the way to a championship his rookie season. After losing in the finals the following season because Russell got hurt and missed half the series, the coach and player won eight consecutive titles together and then two more when Auerbach became a full-time general manager, and Russell made the transition to player-coach. Auerbach was a visionary as a coach but also the perfect man to coach Russell, as he was, for lack of a better phrase, "color blind" during an era when most franchises had unwritten rules aimed at keeping the NBA from becoming "too black." Auerbach and Russell trusted and respected each other and were both driven by winning. They'll go down as the best coach-player combination in NBA history because of it.   Paul J. Maguire/The Boston Globe via Getty Images During every season of his NBA career, Bill Russell played with no less than three, and as many as seven, other future Hall of Fame players on the Celtics. He joined a roster at the same time as Tommy Heinsohn with the likes of Bob Cousy, Bill Sharman and others already in place. Within a few seasons, his college teammate K.C. Jones and Sam Jones joined the franchise. The Cousy era ended about halfway through Russell's career and gave way to the John Havlicek era, which ran until the late 1970s. In all reality though, there wasn't really a Cousy or Havlicek era — there was the Russell era. Most of the Hall of Fame players who were fortunate enough to have played with Russell made the Hall of Fame because they played with Russell.    Bettmann / Contributor / Getty Images Ironically, the greatest shot blocker in NBA history played before the league kept track of the statistic. It wasn't just that he protected the rim and blocked shots, Bill Russell mastered the ability to deflect the ball to himself or a teammate instead of swatting it out of bounds, thereby igniting the Celtics' famous fast break. In researching for "The Book of Basketball," Bill Simmons estimates that Russell blocked anywhere between eight and 15 shots per game in playoffs. For a comparison, the all-time leader in blocked shots in the playoffs (Tim Duncan) averaged a little over two blocks per game.   Bettmann / Getty Images One of the coolest anecdotes for Russell's career is that he would be so tense before games that he would literally get sick in the locker room. Stories of Red Auerbach waiting for Bill Russell to vomit before sending his team out onto the court before big games have become the stuff of NBA lore. And it sure worked — Russell never once lost in a Game 7, going a perfect 10-0. The only time he ever lost a finals was when he was injured and missed multiple games in the series. He was blessed with a ton of God-given talent, but he became a legend because he cared about winning more than anyone else.   D. Raphael/NBAE via Getty Images When the great Red Auerbach decided to retire from coaching before the 1966-67 season (he would remain the team's general manager until 1984), he hired Bill Russell to be the player-coach, making Russell the first ever African-American coach in the NBA. Unfortunately, the Celtics streak of eight straight championships ended that season at the hands of Wilt Chamberlain and the Philadelphia 76ers. This would mark the only time Russell failed to make the NBA Finals in his career. The next two seasons, however, Russell and the Celtics won the title, making Russell the first African-American coach to win a championship in any professional sport. Fittingly, Russell's final game was a Game 7 victory over the heavily favored LA Lakers and their Big 3 of Wilt Chamberlain, Jerry West and Elgin Baylor.   13 of 20 Foil to Wilt Chamberlain KRT SPORTS STORY SLUGGED: OBIT-CHAMBERLAIN KRT PHOTOGRAPH VIA PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER In almost every superhero story, the protagonist has a foil who is perhaps more talented but lacks certain intangible qualities which allow the superhero to emerge victorious. For Bill Russell, his antagonist was Wilt Chamberlain. Chamberlain was more athletically gifted, more skilled, put up much more impressive stats (on and off the court) and became more of a celebrity than Russell. However, Russell was the only big man who was ever able to slow down the Big Dipper. Like all superhero stories, Russell emerged victorious more often than not, going 84-58 in their head-to-head matchups. Russell would make winning plays (11 titles and 10-0 in Game Sevens) and Chamberlain would put up huge numbers (two titles and 4-5 in Game 7s). Russell was beloved by his teammates and peers, whereas Chamberlain was seen as a "me-first" player who would occasionally shrink in the big moments against Russell. Ironically, Russell and Chamberlain were good friends off the court (some saw this as a ploy by Russell to soften Chamberlain up) and remained such until Wilt's death in 1999.   Dan Honda/Contra Costa Times/MCT/Sipa USA It's tough to tell the story of Bill Russell without mentioning Jerry West. Imagine being one of the 10-12 greatest players in NBA history and having a 1-8 record in the NBA Finals because you lost to Bill Russell six out of six times? Well, that's Jerry West's career in a nutshell. Over the years, Russell came to respect West to the point where he once told him following the sixth and final championship over West (the one where West won Finals MVP in a losing effort), "I love you and I just hope you get a championship. You deserve it as much as anyone who as ever played this game." Russell even paid his own way to attend a Jerry West Night ceremony held by the Lakers a few years later and told West that he respected him "more than any man I know."   15 of 20 Civil rights activist Robert Abbott Sengstacke/Getty Images Bill Russell was never one to back down from the bigotry and hate he and his African-American teammates would face during his playing days. He was a member of the Black Power movement and an outspoken supporter of other athletes who fought for their rights, like Muhammad Ali. He helped break down barriers in college and in the NBA, and in 2011 he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama for his accomplishments in the civil rights movement.    16 of 20 Disdain toward Boston Brian Babineau/NBAE via Getty Images Bill Russell's legacy with Boston is a complicated one. On the court, he was viewed as a savior. Off the court, however, he was viewed as a stubborn, controversial player who wouldn't sign autographs for fans and had no trust for the media or anyone who wasn't a teammate or coach of his. This volatile dynamic between Russell and the people of Boston reached a boiling point in the mid-'60s when a group of vandals broke into his home, defecated on his beds, sprayed slurs on his walls and destroyed his personal belongings. Russell would refuse to return to Boston after retiring — even when the Celtics retired his jersey in 1972. Although Russell finally returned to Boston to attended the re-retirement of his jersey ceremony in 1999, he is still clearly hurt by the way he was treated by Bostonians during his career.   17 of 20 Shaq and Kobe fued Robert Hanashiro-USA TODAY Sports The Shaquille O'Neal-Kobe Bryant feud began during the Lakers' three-peat as NBA champions in the early-2000s. O'Neal was the most dominant player in the NBA at the time but also notorious for using the regular season to get into basketball shape. Bryant was one of the league's top players as well but had an insane, Michael Jordan-like intensity about him, which caused him to publicly question Shaq's motivation at times. The feud got nasty during their final seasons together and ultimately led to the Lakers trading Shaq to the Miami Heat in the summer of 2004. The two remained bitter rivals until 2006 when O'Neal squashed the beef before a game, telling the media that he had "orders from the great Bill Russell" to "bury the hatchet" and make peace with Bryant like Russell once had with Wilt Chamberlain. In a private conversation, Russell told O'Neal about his complicated friendship with Chamberlain and how the two found a way to be friends despite their rivalry.   18 of 20 Finals MVP trophy Kyle Terada-USA TODAY Sports In 2009, the NBA announced that the Finals MVP award would be named after Bill Russell. It was a fitting distinction because the league didn't start awarding a Finals MVP until his last title, which, ironically, was the only time a Finals MVP was awarded to a player on the losing team (Jerry West). Had the award existed his entire career during his other 10 championships, who knows how many Finals MVPs he would have won — probably seven or eight. Since having the award named after him, Russell has handed it to some of the NBA's greatest modern players, including Kobe Bryant, Dirk Nowitzki, LeBron James and Kevin Durant.   19 of 20 Place in basketball history (Mt. Rushmore) Bob Donnan-USA TODAY Sports Where does Bill Russell rank in the GOAT (Greatest Of All Time) debate? In "The Book of Basketball," Bill Simmons, an unapologetic Celtics fan, ranked Russell as the second-best player in NBA history behind Michael Jordan and ahead of guys like Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Wilt Chamberlain and Magic Johnson. (Simmons has since moved LeBron James ahead of Russell in his rankings). Eleven championships in 13 seasons and five MVP awards is tough to argue against, so it's safe to say that Russell belongs on the NBA's Mount Rushmore along with Jordan, James and whomever you prefer out of Kareem, Wilt and Magic.    Bettmann / Getty Images A couple of other random notes on Bill Russell:Russell was also a star track athlete. In fact, in 1956, he was the seventh-best high jumper in the world.When it was announced that Wilt Chamberlain was signed for $100,000, Russell made Red Auerbach increase his salary to $100,001 so that he was the highest paid player in the NBA. Russell was the first NBA player to visit Africa in 1959.  He also coached the Seattle SuperSonics from 1973-77 and the Sacramento Kings from 1987-88.In 2013, Boston built a statue of Russell at City Hall Plaza.
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Significant Black firsts in sports history
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The impact of Black athletes across the history of sports is an undeniable one, but also one that has not always been accomplished on equal footing. Of the many highs that have been accomplished, there have been just as many –if not more— that have also had to overcome the rules of the times they were accomplished in. This is a look back at many significant firsts, highlights, and noteworthy moments accomplished by Black athletes across the sporting spectrum, as well as the conditions that secured their significance.   1 of 37 1884: First African-American MLB player (all-time): Moses Fleetwood Walker Photo by Mark Rucker/Transcendental Graphics, Getty Images Technically, William Edward White was the first Black man to play professional baseball in 1879, but he did so while passing as white. However, it was Walker who did so outright as an African-American, playing catcher for the Toledo Blue Stockings in 1884. He faced the intense racial scrutiny of the time and lasted only one season, becoming the last African-American to appear in the MLB for 63 years.   2 of 37 1889: First Black Professional Soccer Player: Arthur Wharton EPL Born in Jamestown of the Gold Coast (in modern-day Ghana), Wharton became the first Black professional soccer player in the English Professional League. Wharton was a goalie and occasional winger, who made 54 overall appearances across four professional seasons. In 2003, he was elected to the English Football Hall of Fame as a pioneer.   3 of 37 1908: First Black Heavyweight Boxing Champion: Jack Johnson Photo by Philipp Kester/ullstein bild via Getty Images At the peak of the Jim Crow era in America, Johnson emerged as one of the nation’s biggest stars. In 1908, the Galveston, Texas, native beat Tommy Burns to claim the lineal world heavyweight title, via a stoppage in the 14 th round, to become the first African-American world heavyweight boxing champion, a title he would carry for the next eight years.   4 of 37 1908: First Black Olympic Gold Medalist: John Taylor Photo by Topical Press Agency/Getty Images Although George Poage was the first African-American Olympian, when he captured two bronze medals in St. Louis four years prior, it was Taylor in 1908 who first reached the top of the podium. Hailing from Washington D.C. and the son of two former slaves, Taylor captured the gold running the third leg of the medley relays, covering 400 meters. In the same year, he would complete his degree in veterinary medicine from the University of Pennsylvania.   5 of 37 1916: First Black Woman to Win a Major Sports Title: Lucy Diggs Stowe Wikipedia In 1917, while a student at Howard University, Diggs Slowe accomplished what would go on to become a milestone in both African-American and female sports as a whole. In winning the American Tennis Association’s first tournament, she became the first African-American woman to win a major sports title. Diggs Slowe is also notable in Black history for being one of the founders of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, the oldest African-American sorority in American history.   6 of 37 1920: First Black Pro Football players: Fitz Pollard & Bobby Marshall Photo by Bruce Bennett Studios via Getty Images Studios/Getty Images Pollard had a habit of making history throughout the early days of his career. In college, he became both the first African-American football player at Brown and the first to be named to the Walter Camp All-American team. In 1920, along with Bobby Marshall, he became one of the first two African-Americans in the NFL. In his second season, Pollard led the Akron Pros to their first championship and the following season was named their co-head coach, becoming the first African-American coach in pro sports history and was still an active player.   7 of 37 1929: First Black Sportscaster: Sherman “Jocko” Maxwell Wikipedia Commons Known mainly by his nickname, ‘Jocko’, Maxwell is widely believed to be the first Black sportscaster in history. He began as a 22-year-old at WNJR in New Jersey and throughout the 1930s interviewed many of the biggest stars in sports. He also was the public address announcer for the Negro Leagues’ Newark Eagles and would go on to become a prominent scholar on Black baseball. Despite his many accomplishments, there were many times when Maxwell was not paid for his work by white broadcast outlets.   Bettmann / Contributor One of the great trailblazers in American history, Robinson’s debut with the Brooklyn Dodgers on April 15, 1947, broke the long-standing color barrier in professional baseball. While his presence in the game changed everything about American sports permanently, his impact within it produced an additional string of substantial firsts as well. He would become baseball’s inaugural winner of the Rookie of the Year award, the first black All-Star, and MVP in 1949, and later, the first Black Hall of Fame inductee into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962.   9 of 37 1947: First Black College Basketball All-American: Don Barksdale Ric Tapia/Icon Sportswire Barksdale was no stranger to knocking down barriers in basketball. In 1947, during his only season at UCLA, he became the first African-American named to a college basketball All-American team. The following year, he became the first Black player to compete as an Olympian for the United States in basketball, going undefeated in the process. In his second NBA season with the Baltimore Bullets, Barksdale became the first African-American All-Star selection.   10 of 37 1948: First Female Black Olympian: Alice Coachman Bettmann / Contributor Coachman was a dominant amateur competitor, winning 10 consecutive national championships in the high jump from 1939 to 1948. She also captured national championships in the 50- and 100-meter dash, along with the 400-meter relay while a student at the Tuskegee Institute. At the 1948 Olympic Games, she captured the gold in the high jump and became the only American woman to medal at the games. It was an overdue honor, as the cancellations of the 1940 and 1944 Olympics due to World War II caused her to miss the chance at both international competition and a much larger place in history.   11 of 37 1950: First African-American NBA players Bettmann / Contributor The integration of professional basketball was simultaneously accomplished by three individuals. In the 1950 NBA Draft, Chuck Cooper, Nat “Sweetwater” Clifton, and Earl Lloyd were all selected and broke into the league in different capacities. Cooper was the first African-American player drafted, going as the first pick in the second round. Due to the season’s schedule, Lloyd was the first to play in a game for the Washington Capitals, while Clifton was the first to sign a contract that season.   12 of 37 1950: First Black Female Tennis Player: Althea Gibson Bettmann / Contributor Gibson was one of the first women to cross the color barrier in professional sports and became the first Black woman to win a Grand Slam title in tennis when she was victorious in the 1956 French Open. Gibson was also the first Black woman to be ranked #1 in the world in 1957. She would go on to capture a title at each of the Grand Slam tournaments for a total of 11 Grand Slam championships overall. She also competed on the LPGA Tour in 1964, becoming the first woman ever to compete professionally in both tennis and golf.   13 of 37 1956: First Cy Young Award Winner: Don Newcombe Photo by The Stanley Weston Archive/Getty Images On the heels of a 27 win season that also saw him named National League MVP, Newcombe became the inaugural winner of the award that has become synonymous with pitching excellence. He would become the first (and one of only two) pitchers to win Cy Young, MVP, and Rookie of the Year honors in his career. Seven years earlier, he became the first African-American starting pitcher in a World Series game.   14 of 37 1958: First African-American NHL player: Willie O’Ree Photo by Bruce Bennett Studios via Getty Images Studios/Getty Images While Art Dorrington was the first black player to sign an NHL contract in 1950, it was O’Ree who first made it to the ice. On Jan. 18, 1958, O’Ree debuted for the Boston Bruins against the Montreal Canadiens, becoming the first Black player in the league’s history. In his career, O’Ree would play 22 years between the NHL and minors.   15 of 37 1960: First Black Female To Win Multiple Medals: Wilma Rudolph Hulton Archive / Stringer At the 1960 Olympic Games, Rudolph became the first woman to capture multiple medals. She individually captured the gold in both the 100 and 200-meter dash and added a third gold as a member of the 4 x 100 relay team. Counting the 1956 Games, Rudolph captured four medals overall and retired as the world record holder in all three of her Gold medal events.   16 of 37 1961: First Black Heisman Trophy Winner: Ernie Davis Bettmann / Contributor It took 26 years for an African-American to lay claim to a Heisman Trophy, and it was Davis who did so. Following in the footsteps of the great Jim Brown, Davis was twice selected as a consensus All-American, running for a total of 2,386 yards and 20 touchdowns. Davis was selected first in the 1962 NFL Draft and fourth overall in the 1962 AFL draft but was diagnosed with leukemia before playing and died a year later.   17 of 37 1961: First Black PGA Player: Charlie Sifford PGA TOUR Archive / Contributor During the segregation era of golf, Sifford won the National Negro Open four consecutive times during the 1950s. Sifford fought his way ahead into a full-fledged PGA competition, including a victory at the 1957 Long Beach Open versus PGA Tour competition. In 1961, he finally joined the PGA Tour and six years later captured the 1967 Greater Hartford Open, becoming the first African-American victor in PGA history.   18 of 37 1963: First Black Driver to win NASCAR event: Wendell Scott Photo by ISC Archives/CQ-Roll Call Group via Getty Images After competing in local circuits in the Virginia area, Scott gained his NASCAR license in 1953, becoming the first black racer to compete within the promotion. He debuted on the Grand National Series level in 1961 and in 1964 won the Jacksonville 200, becoming the first African-American to win at NASCAR’s highest level. He led the race for 27 laps but still had to protest for his win, as the checkered flag was not initially raised to recognize his victory.   19 of 37 1966: First Black Umpire: Emmett Ashford Bettmann / Contributor Inspired by the journey of Jackie Robinson to the Majors, Ashford embarked on a lengthy climb towards the Major Leagues by umpiring throughout the minors for over a decade in the 1950s. In 1966, he finally was called up to the Majors, where his charismatic style behind the plate made him a hit with fans. In 1967, he became the first Black umpire to work an All-Star Game and in 1970 he earned the same distinction in the World Series, appearing in all five games.   20 of 37 1966: First Professional Black Head Coach: Bill Russell Photo by Icon and Image/Getty Images Russell didn't limit his dominance to just his on-court exploits with the Boston Celtics (where he was the league's first Black MVP in 1958). In 1966, he became the first African-American head coach of a major professional sports team in the modern era, when he became the team's player/manager. Two years later, he became the first Black man to coach his team to a championship.   21 of 37 1967: First Black World Series MVP: Bob Gibson Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images During the 1967 World Series, Gibson pitched Games 1, 4, and 7 for the St. Louis Cardinals against the Boston Red Sox. He was utterly dominant along the way, allowing only three runs over 14 hits across three complete-game victories. He ran up a total of 26 strikeouts against only five walks, threw a shutout in Game 4, and even hit a home run in Game 7. All after rallying from a mid-season broken leg from a ball hit off of him in July.   22 of 37 1968: First Black Tennis Grand Slam Winner: Arthur Ashe Photo by Harry Dempster/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images In 1968, Ashe was the first African-American male to become the world’s top ranked tennis player. In the same year, he became the first African-American man to win a Grand Slam singles title at the U.S. Open. He would later gain the same distinction at the Australian Open (1975) and Wimbledon (1975). He remains the only African-American male to hold these distinctions.   23 of 37 1968: First Black Quarterback (Modern era): Marlin Briscoe Denver Post via Getty Images While the Black quarterback has finally gained some level of deserved normalcy and prominence in the game, Briscoe was decades ahead of his time. In 1968, he became the first black player in modern football history to start at quarterback, when he did so for the Denver Broncos of the AFL. Briscoe threw 14 touchdowns over five starts on the season and added an additional three scores on the ground. Despite his early success, the ’68 season marked his only as a professional QB before being moved to wide receiver.   24 of 37 1970: First NBA MVP Sweep: Willis Reed Photo by Ross Lewis/Getty Images In route to leading the New York Knicks to the first of two consecutive NBA Championships, Reed became the first player in league history to win three MVPs in one season. He won All-Star Game MVP with 21 points and 11 rebounds for the Eastern Conference. He then won regular season MVP after averaging 21 points and 14 rebounds per game and leading the Knicks on an 18-game win streak. Finally, he capped the year with NBA Finals MVP after twice topping 35 points and heroically rallying from a severe thigh injury to finish the series.   25 of 37 1972: First Black General Manager: Wayne Embry Photo by Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images After completing an 11-year, Hall of Fame career in the 1960s, Embry turned his attention towards executive leadership. He played a major role in bringing Oscar Robertson to Milwaukee to team with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, which resulted in a title for the Milwaukee Bucks in 1971. Subsequentially, he promoted to General Manager the next season, making him the first African-American to hold the position in pro sports. He later became the first Black team president and COO with the Toronto Raptors.   26 of 37 1975: First Black MLB Manager: Frank Robinson Bettmann / Contributor Although Buck O'Neill became the first black coach in MLB history in 1962 with the Chicago Cubs, Robinson took it a step further. After a ground-breaking career where he became the first player to be named MVP in both the National and American Leagues, Robinson set his dogged determination on making additional history in the dugout. In 1975 he became the first African-American manager in MLB history when he took over the helm for the Cleveland Indians.   27 of 37 1984: Black Stanley Cup Champion: Grant Fuhr Photo by Bruce Bennett Studios via Getty Images Studios/Getty Images A superstar goalie for the powerhouse Edmonton Oilers of the 1980s, Fuhr is responsible for a number of notable firsts for blacks in the NHL. Most notably, he became the first Black player to have his name engraved on the Stanley Cup in 1984, the first of five times he would win sport’s greatest trophy. Fuhr is also the first Black goalie in NHL history, the first black recipient of both the Vezina and Jennings Trophies for excellence in the net, and first the black inductee to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2003.   28 of 37 1989: First Black NFL Head Coach: Art Shell Photo by Owen C. Shaw/Getty Images When the Los Angeles Raiders named Shell as their head coach in 1989, he became the first African-American to hold the role in the modern NFL. He was preceded only by Fritz Pollard, who was co-head coach of the Akron Pros in 1921. An eight-time Pro Bowl selection as a player and member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, Shell was named AFC Coach of the Year in 1990 when he guided the Raiders to a 12-4 record and the AFC West championship.   29 of 37 1992: First Black Manager to win World Series: Cito Gaston Bettmann / Contributor In 1992 Gaston guided the Toronto Blue Jays to the first of two consecutive World Series championships. In the process, he became the first African-American manager to ever win a World Series. Between two terms of managing the Blue Jays between 1989 to 1997 and again from 2008 to 2020, Gaston won 894 games. Gaston has the rare distinction of winning the World Series in every season he reached the postseason in his career.   30 of 37 1997: First Black Golf Major Champion: Tiger Woods Photo by Augusta National/Getty Images Years after the contributions of Charlie Sitton and Lee Elder, it was a 21-year-old Woods who finally reached the mountaintop for Black golfers. Woods dominated the field at 1997 Masters, shooting -18 under par for the tournament and winning by a margin of 12 strokes, both setting all-time records. In the process, Woods’ first Major title was the first by a Black golfer in the 63-year history of the tournament and 81-year history of the PGA. It also helped to propel Woods to become the first –and only— Black golfer to ever be ranked #1 in the world shortly thereafter.   31 of 37 1997: First Black UFC Champion: Maurice Smith Photo by Jeff Bottari/Zuffa LLC/Zuffa LLC via Getty Images Already a world champion kickboxer for multiple international federations, Smith made his way to the young Ultimate Fighting Championship promotion in 1997. At UFC 14, Smith surprisingly defeated heavyweight championship Mark Coleman via unanimous decision to claim the division title. In the process, Smith because the first striker to ever defeat a wrestler of Coleman’s stature in the UFC, further expanding the possibilities of the style clashing –yet blending— combat style MMA has developed into.   32 of 37 2002: First Black Owner: Robert Johnson Photo by Bob Leverone/Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images Although there have been many great Black executives and owners in sports history, such as Rube Foster and Effa Manley, it was Johnson who made a massive leap forward in the big-money era of professional sports. The founder of BET and first Black billionaire, Johnson bid for and was awarded rights to the expansion Charlotte Bobcats. He was over the team for eight years as majority owner, before selling to Michael Jordan –the second majority-black owner in NBA history— in 2010.   33 of 37 2002: First Black Winter Olympics Medalist: Vonetta Flowers MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP via Getty Images While African-American athletes have long made their marks on the summer games, the Winter Olympics have been slower to see such crossover impact. Flowers carved out her own place in history after transitioning from the world of track and field to bobsledding. Along with Jill Bracken, she captured gold in the two-woman bobsled event in 2002, becoming the first African-American to ever win gold at the Winter Games.   Photo by Ron C. Angle/Getty Images In February of 2002, Williams ascended to #1 in the Women’s Tennis Association, making her the first African-American woman to do so in the Open era (since 1968). Eight years later, along with her sister Serena, she became a part of the first Black Doubles pairing to reach #1 in the world. The duo has won 14 Grand Slam Women’s doubles titles and remains undefeated in Grand Slam finals together.   35 of 37 2003: First Black Tennis player to hold all Grand Slam titles: Serena Williams Photo by Nick Laham/Getty Images Following her victory in the 2003 Australian Open, Williams held all four Grand Slam titles in women’s tennis – not only in history but also simultaneously. The feat was dubbed the ‘Serena Slam’ and it also completed her rounding out the feat. She defeated her older sister Venus to claim the title, but also teamed up with her to win the women’s doubles championship at the same tournament. To date, Williams’ 23 career individual Grand Slam titles are the most in history in the Open Era.   Photo by Clive Rose/Getty Images When Hamilton signed with McLaren in 2007, he became the first black driver in the 57-year history of the Formula One. He quickly embarked on what would become a record-shattering career, capturing his first pole position and victory at the Canadian Grand Prix in the sixth F1 race, and hasn’t slowed from there. To date, Hamilton has won 7 Formula One Championships and 95 races in his career, both all-time records.   37 of 37 2012: First Black All-Around Gymnastics Champion: Gabby Douglas Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images At the 2012 Olympics in London, Douglas became the first African-American to be crowned Individual All-Around Champion in the gymnastics competition. In addition to her individual gold, she also captured the team gold as well as a member of the popular “Fierce Five” women’s team. This made her the first American in history to conquer both competitions in a single Olympics.
คาสิโน ออนไลน์888 ทางเข้า คาสิโน คาสิโน 1688 คาสิโน 1988 คาสิโน ทรูวอลเล็ต
Bill Russell ได้รับวัคซีน COVID-19 ซึ่งเป็นส่วนหนึ่งของความพยายาม PSA ของ NBA
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Bill Russell ตำนานของ Boston Celtics กลายเป็นไอคอน NBA คนล่าสุดที่เข้าร่วมความพยายามอย่างต่อเนื่องของลีกในการสร้างความตระหนักรู้เกี่ยวกับวัคซีน COVID-19 ต่อหน้ากล้อง แชมป์ NBA 11 สมัย, รัสเซล, NBA MVP 5 สมัย, หอเกียรติยศและเหรียญแห่งอิสรภาพของประธานาธิบดี - รวมถึงรางวัลอื่น ๆ อีกมากมาย, รางวัลและเกียรติยศ - ร่วมกับเพื่อนร่วมตำนานอย่างคารีมอับดุล - จับบาร์และซานอันโตนิโอสเปอร์สหัวหน้าโค้ชเกร็กโปโปวิช การแข่งขันลีกซิกเนเจอร์ในฐานะโฆษกของโครงการ PSA ของ NBA การประกาศบริการสาธารณะที่ NBA แบ่งปันบนโซเชียลมีเดียเมื่อวันพฤหัสบดีมีไฮไลท์จากอาชีพที่ไม่ธรรมดาของรัสเซลตลอดจนภาพของไอคอนที่ได้รับวัคซีน COVID-19 "ฉันเพิ่งมาหาภาพ COVID ของฉันและนี่เป็นช็อตเดียวที่ฉันจะไม่ปิดกั้น" รัสเซลกล่าวในวิดีโอโดยสวมหน้ากากเซลติกส์และหมวก Lakers ที่มีชื่อย่อของ Kobe Bryant ตัวสุดท้าย ไม่มีเซลติกส์ได้รับบาดเจ็บระหว่างการโจมตีของฉัน มาทำสิ่งนี้ด้วยกัน “ เมื่อต้นเดือนที่ผ่านมาอดัมซิลเวอร์ผู้บัญชาการ NBA ประกาศว่า NBA กำลังพิจารณาว่าผู้เล่นจะใช้วัคซีน COVID-19 ขั้นสุดท้ายหรือไม่เพื่อกระตุ้นให้แฟน ๆ ของลีกทำเช่นเดียวกันกับประชากรเฉพาะกลุ่มอื่น ๆ ผู้เชี่ยวชาญด้านสาธารณสุขหลายคนแนะนำให้สนับสนุนวัคซีนแก่ผู้มีชื่อเสียง สมาชิกของชุมชนบางแห่ง - อย่างไรก็ตามไม่มีการถกเถียงเกี่ยวกับการเปิดตัววัคซีน COVID-19 รวมถึงความกังวลว่าประชากรที่มีสิทธิพิเศษเช่นนักกีฬามืออาชีพอาจได้รับสิทธิพิเศษในการปฏิบัติระหว่างขั้นตอนนี้รวมถึงการเผยแพร่สู่สาธารณะ Silver ได้ย้ำคำสัญญาของเขาเมื่อเร็ว ๆ นี้ ในเดือนธันวาคมซึ่งเป็นไปตามการคาดเดาเอ็นบีเอ "จะไม่มีวันข้ามเส้น" เมื่อต้องได้รับวัคซีน COVID-19
คาสิโน ออนไลน์888 ทางเข้า คาสิโน คาสิโน 1688 คาสิโน 1988 คาสิโน ทรูวอลเล็ต